Three by Mee

Bonjour Citygaragistes,

We are happy to be back, by popular demand, with the entire “Three By Mee” trilogy for this weekend’s “City Garage Classic.” Not all of you got a chance to see all three, so here they are, all available to stream one after the other—or to pick up one or two you might have missed. As you know, they are from a season we dedicated in 2006 to one of our favorite writers, Charles Mee, and they’re based on the Greek tragedies of the same name. They’ll be available from Friday at 8:00pm through next Wednesday at midnight on our YouTube channel:

“Agamemnon”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esg3eF73ObI

“The Bacchae”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLAQn4ia4dE

“Iphigenia”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxe959a0thE

Please share the link with your friends. As always, they’re available for free but we certainly welcome any donation you can send our way to help support the work at City Garage. You can give through our Chuffed page—where you also will find many fun and interesting and thought-provoking performances by our talented members. You can also watch an introduction to the “Three By Mee” trilogy by Troy Dunn.

https://chuffed.org/project/citygarage

Merci to our donor of this last week:

Nita June

We hope to see you all again at the theatre once this cauchemar is over! Stay safe and wear a mask.

Merci, and love

Frederique

Visit the City Garage Virtual Cabaret! New videos daily!

Three by Mee:

Works by Charles L. Mee

City Garage is proud to present a series of productions from 2006 devoted to one of the most original dramatists currently writing in the United States, Obie-award-winning playwright Charles L. Mee. The original project staged three of his radical reworking of Greek tragedy, Agamemnon, The Bacchae, and Iphigenia. The unifying theme of the project was the waste of war and the agonizing price of male violence juxtaposed against the deep mysteries of female power—its capacity both to endure suffering and to exact its revenge.

All three will be available on the City Garage YouTube channel from Friday, July 17 through Wednesday, July 22nd:

City Garage YouTube channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjPA-X16UajyAcCetUpkd_g

Part 1: Agamemnon

In the first play of the series, Mee tears apart and reconstructs the classic tragedy by Aeschylus, transforming it into a haunting meditation on the struggles and strife of our own time. Agamemnon, returning victorious (or so he attempts to convince himself) from a ruinous and misguided war, finds only a barren world to greet him. Clytemnestra has waited patiently for his return, growing steadily more mad with her hunger to revenge the murder of their daughter, and his betrayal with Cassandra. Agamemnon the hero, red with blood, has returned to discover that the only thing he has accomplished is the destruction of his own society and ultimately, of himself.


(Left to right) Troy Dunn, and Marie-Francoise Theodore in Charles Mee’s “Agamemnon” at City Garage

Part 2: The Bacchae

Pentheus is drunk with power; his Armani-suited aides parrot his every thought; no one can resist the direction he is charting for his society—except the women. Rejecting his authority, they have disappeared into the hills, following a strange new God of sexuality, Dionysus. They have withdrawn into the dark, unknowable power of the ancient feminine, and Pentheus cannot bear it. He will return these crazed females to their proper place, contain them once again by male authority. But Dionysus, the ultimate seducer, persuades him that, ironically, the means to regain his power is to give it up—temporarily. If he wishes to gain access to the women’s secret orgies he must become a woman himself. It is a Faustian bargain Pentheus cannot resist.

City Garage is proud to announce a season of productions devoted to one of the most original dramatists currently writing in the United States, Obie-award-winning playwright Charles L. Mee. The project will present three of his radical reworking of Greek tragedy, Agamemnon, The Bacchae, and Iphigenia. The unifying theme of the project is the waste of war and the agonizing price of male violence juxtaposed against the deep mysteries of female power—its capacity both to endure suffering and to exact its revenge.


(Left to right) Justin Davanzo, Juni Buchner, Mariko Oka (photo Paul Rubenstein)

Part 3: Iphigenia

The disaster of the Trojan War defined its times. Its circle of destruction was ever expanding, and annihilated the victors as utterly as the vanquished. In this, the last play of the series, we see the tragic beginning of the story which began in Agamemnon—the first critical mistake of leadership which led, a decade later, to the fall of the house of Atreus. Agamemnon, eager for conquest, seizes on the excuse of Helen’s abduction to lead his nation to war. Using the familiar arguments of patriotism and sacrifice, he expects those he leads to die for him. This, they are willing to do. But first they demand a sacrifice of him: his own daughter’s life. If the price of war is the death of those who follow, let those who lead be the first to pay that price. Agamemnon now has his choice—a choice that unleashes the terrible consequences that will follow.


(Left to right) Troy Dunn, Marie-Francoise Theodore in “Iphigenia” at Photo: Paul Rubenstein